medievalpoc:

mmex submitted to medievalpoc:

for Contemporary Art Week!

Kara Walker, from The Emancipation Approximation series, 2000. Screenprinted on paper.

official website

elpasha71:

Georgia O’Keeffe,  The Mountains, New Mexico, 1951

headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com
headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”
Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com

headyhunter:

Michael Grab has mastered the art of stone balancing. He explains how he does it. “The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of “tripod” for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. In the finer point balances, these clicks can be felt on a scale smaller than millimeters. Some point balances will give the illusion of weightlessness as the rocks look to be barely touching. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”

Find more heady works at www.headyhunter.com

likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)
likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)

likeafieldmouse:

Francis Alys - Sometimes Making Something Leads to Nothing (1997)

lucienballard:

‘Mobile Lovers’
Banksy’s newest work uploaded to his website.
Photograph: Banksy

lucienballard:

‘Mobile Lovers’
Banksy’s newest work uploaded to his website.
Photograph: Banksy

lucienballard:

Mobile Lovers

Banksy’s newest work uploaded to his website.

Photograph: Banksy

exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 
exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 

exhibition-ism:

Grammy nominated artist Serge Gay Jr. has a new solo show at Spoke Art in San Francisco. It’s on view until April 26th, be sure to go check it out! 

ghanailoveyou:

Africa Movie Academy Award Winner Set to Make North American Debut

The Huffington Post recently named Akosua Adoma Owusu “Most Promising Filmmaker” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and one of the “Top 30 Black Contemporary Artists Under 40”. Her semi-autobiographical film, Kwaku Ananse, has been winning awards of its own on the international stage this year. Now, both film and filmmaker are headed to the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), where Kwaku Ananse will make its North American debut.

Kwaku Ananse is one of a handful of shorts being featured in the program titled To Repel Ghosts: Urban Tales from the African Continent, which showcases remarkably uncanny and fiercely contemporary African stories. 

The Toronto International Film Festival describes Kwaku Ananse as “a spellbinding, semi-autobiographical interpretation of a traditional Ghanaian folktale in which the contemporary collides with the mythological in both content and form.” (Trailer)

The film’s quiet, deliberative tone draws viewers into the lead character’s experience, inviting empathy, and encouraging each of us to consider the state of our own relationships. 

Owusu describes the film as “an intensely personal project” that is “a reflection of a broader truth about the human condition,” and “an effort to preserve a fable my late father passed on to me.” 

Kwaku Ananse premiered at the Berlinale Film Festival and has since received accolades at the Cannes Short Film Corner and the French Film Academy’s Golden Nights Panorama, where it was included in the World’s Best Short Films category. It was produced by Lisa Cortes (Oscar-Nominated, Precious) and Julio Chavezmontes (Sundance New Frontier, Halley) and was created with the support of Focus Features Africa First, Art Matters and the Sarah Jacobson Film Grant. 

Akosua Adoma Owusu is currently developing her feature debut, Black Sunshine which recently won the ARTE International Prize at Durban FilmMart and funding support by The Creative Capital Foundation. 


Follow Akosua Adoma Owusu | Twitter | Facebook



New Kwaku Ananse movie poster by: Tyler Orsak Akosua Adoma Owusu photos by: Mantse Aryeequaye of Accra [dot] Alt





ghanailoveyou:

Africa Movie Academy Award Winner Set to Make North American Debut

The Huffington Post recently named Akosua Adoma Owusu “Most Promising Filmmaker” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and one of the “Top 30 Black Contemporary Artists Under 40”. Her semi-autobiographical film, Kwaku Ananse, has been winning awards of its own on the international stage this year. Now, both film and filmmaker are headed to the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), where Kwaku Ananse will make its North American debut.

Kwaku Ananse is one of a handful of shorts being featured in the program titled To Repel Ghosts: Urban Tales from the African Continent, which showcases remarkably uncanny and fiercely contemporary African stories. 

The Toronto International Film Festival describes Kwaku Ananse as “a spellbinding, semi-autobiographical interpretation of a traditional Ghanaian folktale in which the contemporary collides with the mythological in both content and form.” (Trailer)

The film’s quiet, deliberative tone draws viewers into the lead character’s experience, inviting empathy, and encouraging each of us to consider the state of our own relationships. 

Owusu describes the film as “an intensely personal project” that is “a reflection of a broader truth about the human condition,” and “an effort to preserve a fable my late father passed on to me.” 

Kwaku Ananse premiered at the Berlinale Film Festival and has since received accolades at the Cannes Short Film Corner and the French Film Academy’s Golden Nights Panorama, where it was included in the World’s Best Short Films category. It was produced by Lisa Cortes (Oscar-Nominated, Precious) and Julio Chavezmontes (Sundance New Frontier, Halley) and was created with the support of Focus Features Africa First, Art Matters and the Sarah Jacobson Film Grant. 

Akosua Adoma Owusu is currently developing her feature debut, Black Sunshine which recently won the ARTE International Prize at Durban FilmMart and funding support by The Creative Capital Foundation. 


Follow Akosua Adoma Owusu | Twitter | Facebook



New Kwaku Ananse movie poster by: Tyler Orsak Akosua Adoma Owusu photos by: Mantse Aryeequaye of Accra [dot] Alt





ghanailoveyou:

Africa Movie Academy Award Winner Set to Make North American Debut

The Huffington Post recently named Akosua Adoma Owusu “Most Promising Filmmaker” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and one of the “Top 30 Black Contemporary Artists Under 40”. Her semi-autobiographical film, Kwaku Ananse, has been winning awards of its own on the international stage this year. Now, both film and filmmaker are headed to the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), where Kwaku Ananse will make its North American debut.

Kwaku Ananse is one of a handful of shorts being featured in the program titled To Repel Ghosts: Urban Tales from the African Continent, which showcases remarkably uncanny and fiercely contemporary African stories. 

The Toronto International Film Festival describes Kwaku Ananse as “a spellbinding, semi-autobiographical interpretation of a traditional Ghanaian folktale in which the contemporary collides with the mythological in both content and form.” (Trailer)

The film’s quiet, deliberative tone draws viewers into the lead character’s experience, inviting empathy, and encouraging each of us to consider the state of our own relationships. 

Owusu describes the film as “an intensely personal project” that is “a reflection of a broader truth about the human condition,” and “an effort to preserve a fable my late father passed on to me.” 

Kwaku Ananse premiered at the Berlinale Film Festival and has since received accolades at the Cannes Short Film Corner and the French Film Academy’s Golden Nights Panorama, where it was included in the World’s Best Short Films category. It was produced by Lisa Cortes (Oscar-Nominated, Precious) and Julio Chavezmontes (Sundance New Frontier, Halley) and was created with the support of Focus Features Africa First, Art Matters and the Sarah Jacobson Film Grant. 

Akosua Adoma Owusu is currently developing her feature debut, Black Sunshine which recently won the ARTE International Prize at Durban FilmMart and funding support by The Creative Capital Foundation. 


Follow Akosua Adoma Owusu | Twitter | Facebook



New Kwaku Ananse movie poster by: Tyler Orsak Akosua Adoma Owusu photos by: Mantse Aryeequaye of Accra [dot] Alt

ghanailoveyou:

Africa Movie Academy Award Winner Set to Make North American Debut
The Huffington Post recently named Akosua Adoma Owusu “Most Promising Filmmaker” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and one of the “Top 30 Black Contemporary Artists Under 40”. Her semi-autobiographical film, Kwaku Ananse, has been winning awards of its own on the international stage this year. Now, both film and filmmaker are headed to the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), where Kwaku Ananse will make its North American debut.
Kwaku Ananse is one of a handful of shorts being featured in the program titled To Repel Ghosts: Urban Tales from the African Continent, which showcases remarkably uncanny and fiercely contemporary African stories. 
The Toronto International Film Festival describes Kwaku Ananse as “a spellbinding, semi-autobiographical interpretation of a traditional Ghanaian folktale in which the contemporary collides with the mythological in both content and form.” (Trailer)
The film’s quiet, deliberative tone draws viewers into the lead character’s experience, inviting empathy, and encouraging each of us to consider the state of our own relationships. 
Owusu describes the film as “an intensely personal project” that is “a reflection of a broader truth about the human condition,” and “an effort to preserve a fable my late father passed on to me.” 
Kwaku Ananse premiered at the Berlinale Film Festival and has since received accolades at the Cannes Short Film Corner and the French Film Academy’s Golden Nights Panorama, where it was included in the World’s Best Short Films category. It was produced by Lisa Cortes (Oscar-Nominated, Precious) and Julio Chavezmontes (Sundance New Frontier, Halley) and was created with the support of Focus Features Africa First, Art Matters and the Sarah Jacobson Film Grant. 
Akosua Adoma Owusu is currently developing her feature debut, Black Sunshine which recently won the ARTE International Prize at Durban FilmMart and funding support by The Creative Capital Foundation. 
New Kwaku Ananse movie poster by: Tyler Orsak 
Akosua Adoma Owusu photos by: Mantse Aryeequaye of Accra [dot] Alt

(Source: afrohoney)

artandcetera:

Human Error
Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 
artandcetera:

Human Error
Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 
artandcetera:

Human Error
Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 
artandcetera:

Human Error
Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 
artandcetera:

Human Error
Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 

artandcetera:

Human Error

Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York. Human Error is a series of nostalgic polaroids that depict the broken heart as a computerized error that may or may not be restored in a few mouseclicks. 

iheartmyart:

Jose Palacios, Abanicos, 180 x 150 cm., Acrylic / canvas, 2010

eastafricaart:

Sam Ntiro   (Tanzania, 1923-1993)

Top: Working on a Winding Road

Bottom: Log-cutting in the Forest

(Source: stevenson.info)

koutasasaiartstudio:

by Kouta Sasai

yagazieemezi:

I am so happy to have stumbled across Hilary Sloane and her work. You can’t help but to be drawn in by her collaged gifs.
Based in Melbourne, Sloane’s work ranges from illustrations and animation, to collages and photography.
Find her: tumblr / vimeo / store
yagazieemezi:

I am so happy to have stumbled across Hilary Sloane and her work. You can’t help but to be drawn in by her collaged gifs.
Based in Melbourne, Sloane’s work ranges from illustrations and animation, to collages and photography.
Find her: tumblr / vimeo / store
yagazieemezi:

I am so happy to have stumbled across Hilary Sloane and her work. You can’t help but to be drawn in by her collaged gifs.
Based in Melbourne, Sloane’s work ranges from illustrations and animation, to collages and photography.
Find her: tumblr / vimeo / store

yagazieemezi:

I am so happy to have stumbled across Hilary Sloane and her work. You can’t help but to be drawn in by her collaged gifs.

Based in Melbourne, Sloane’s work ranges from illustrations and animation, to collages and photography.

Find her: tumblr / vimeo / store